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Injecting Pmv Vaccine


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I keep fancy pigeons and the show season is about to start, and i thought i would vacinate my birds againt PMV for the first time.

 

I was told to buy some columbovac pmv, but I could not find any for sale on the internet. I was recomended this as its safer to use.

 

Instead i've found Nobilis (Nobivac) PMV Vaccine for sale, and i need some advice as how to inject.

 

Does this vacine come with saringes and how do i inject?

 

I read that you inject the skin at the base of the next, away from the head.

 

Looking on Youtube i've seen 2 american videos, showing how to inject between the leg and the body which look easier than at the back of the neck.

 

 

what do you think?

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For the active immunisation of pigeons against clinical signs caused by a virulent PPMV-1 infection. The vaccine has been shown to reduce virus excretion after challenge significantly.

 

Each animal should be given 0.25 ml of vaccine by subcutaneous injection into the lower back part of the neck. Ensure that vaccination equipment is clean and sterile before use. Advice on correct administration

 

Birds can be vaccinated from five weeks of age. Because it takes 4 weeks to obtain protective immunity, the initial vaccination should preferably take place at 6 weeks before being entered in races or exhibitions, and before pairing up.

 

A single vaccination will provide protection for one year and an annual booster vaccination is recommended.

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For the active immunisation of pigeons against clinical signs caused by a virulent PPMV-1 infection. The vaccine has been shown to reduce virus excretion after challenge significantly.

 

Each animal should be given 0.25 ml of vaccine by subcutaneous injection into the lower back part of the neck. Ensure that vaccination equipment is clean and sterile before use. Advice on correct administration

 

Birds can be vaccinated from five weeks of age. Because it takes 4 weeks to obtain protective immunity, the initial vaccination should preferably take place at 6 weeks before being entered in races or exhibitions, and before pairing up.

 

A single vaccination will provide protection for one year and an annual booster vaccination is recommended.

Would just like to add that the ammount given depends on which vaccine you buy.

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Two points:

(1) Its only racing pigeons that need to be vaccinated. Down through the years on threads like this those with fancy breeds have said they didn't vaccinate their birds as their show rules didn't require it.

 

(2)If you're not sure how to do it, best get someone who has done it to do it for you first time, showing you the way. Its a two person job anyway, one to hold, one to jag, once you feel more confident, swap round. :)

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Notes - VACCINATING THE RACING PIGEON

 

Introduction.

Pigeons can be vaccinated against two diseases - pigeon paramyxovirus infection and pigeon pox.

Vaccinating pigeons is a mass vaccination programme with several hundred being vaccinated at one time. In a well organised system it is possible to vaccinate hundred pigeons against paramyxovirus infection and pox in an hour. Vaccinating guns will be used and one needle may be used to vaccinate 25 or more pigeons. Good vaccinating practices are required.

Whilst you may not wish to do the vaccinating, you do have a responsibility to ensure that the pigeon owner is aware of the correct procedures.

Key Points

Poor vaccination practices occur which may result in death of the pigeon or susceptibility to natural infection.

Vaccination site

There is an extensive web of veins under the skin which extends down the back and sides of the neck. This is more noticeable in the cock than the hen. It stops at the base of the neck. Mortality has resulted from the inadvertent injection of vaccine into the veins. Death usually occurs within an hour of vaccination. Hence, when administering vaccines, it is important to inject as near to the base of the neck as possible with the needle pointing towards the tail.

Aseptic technique

Withdrawing the vaccine from the bottle

Always have one needle that stays in the vaccine bottle that is only used for withdrawing vaccine. The other needles can be used to inject your birds. This stops you inadvertently contaminating the vaccine with dirt from the pigeons skin.

Cleaning the skin

In the authors experience, the use of surgical spirit at the injection site has two major benefits. Firstly, it sanitises the injection site. Secondly, it dampens the feathers around the vaccination site resulting in a clear view for the administration of the vaccine.

Surgical spirit does not stain the feathers and will rapidly evaporate in warm weather. In the short term, if a pigeon is represented for vaccination, this is quite obvious.

Cleaning the needle

One needle will often be used to vaccinate several pigeons ( 1 to several hundred). This may be the cause of problems. When using the Nobilis Paramyxo vaccine it is recommended that you sterilise the needle between pigeons. The importance of sanitising the needle between birds should be stressed.

However, DO NOT do this with Colombovac PMV or PMV/Pox. Neither do I recommend it when using Chevivac-S (paratyphoid vaccine). The reason for this is that the latter 2 vaccines have a live component that could be killed by the sterilising solution.

Hygiene will be improved by using a new sterile needle for every basket of birds. Very expensive birds or birds that are special for other reasons should be brought to the vaccinators attention so that a new needle can be used for that bird.

Nobilis paramyxo

When using Nobi-Vac Paramyxo, this can easily be done using a sponge soaked in surgical spirit contained in a small pot. The needle can be dipped in this in between birds.

Colombovac and Colombovac + Pox

The manufacturer does not recommend dipping the needle in surgical spirit between birds. This is particularly important when vaccinating against Pox. The surgical spirit will kill the Pox vaccine.

Points to watch

1. The stress of vaccination can be reduced by giving a soluble multivitamin preparation from the day prior to vaccinating to the day after vaccination.

2. Advise that the birds are not exercised the day of vaccination. Birds that have been given the live pox vaccine should not be mixed with non vaccinated birds for 6 weeks.

3. Do not vaccinate unhealthy birds.

4. Dirty technique may resulting in vaccination abscesses .

5. Vaccinating hens due to lay may result in retained eggs.

 

Problems associated with poor vaccination technique

Injection abscesses

These are the result of faecal contamination of the needle. The needle can be contaminated by two methods. Firstly, it is dropped onto pigeon faeces. A limited number of needles will be supplied with a bottle of vaccine and if this occurs with the last one, there is little choice but to continue. Secondly, catching and holding the pigeon will inevitably result in the handlers hands becoming contaminated with faeces. You will often see the fancier spit on a faeces covered ring to clean it so that the number can be read and checked off the vaccinating sheet. The same fingers may then be used to pull the feathers back to allow the vaccinator to see the injection site. This simple and normal procedure can quickly contaminate the skin.

Clinical signs associated with injection abscesses

This is a clinical problem that is reported occasionally. The abscess being detected from about 7 to 28 days after vaccination depending on the vigilance of the owner. This author suspects that it may occur more frequently as a subclinical problem that is responsible for leaving pigeons under par.

The initial signs will be lethargy, inappetance, reluctance to fly and a hunched up appearance.

The feathers over the injection site may be seen to be standing up as the swelling enlarges. If left untreated the abscess will enlarge and the bird may die.

Bacteriology

In one investigation, aerobic and anaerobic culture from abscesses regularly yielded Streptococcus faecalis. In addition Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides oralis and E.coli were isolated. The former two, both being toxin producers were recovered from birds that had died. These are all associated with faecal contamination.

A further small study of the skin of eight healthy pigeons from four lofts failed to yield any anaerobes but did yield four cultures of Staphylococcus epidermidis. The remaining four were sterile. However, examination of the skin of four birds from a loft with a wet dropping problem yielded positive aerobic cultures of Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Lactobacillus spp. from all the birds. (Personal communication Dr.A-M. Farmer, Intervet UK Ltd.). All inactivated vaccines contain adjuvants. The inoculation of bacteria with the vaccine is likely to predispose to abscess formation.

 

Looked better on my original - David

 

Notes - VACCINATING THE RACING PIGEON

 

Introduction.

Pigeons can be vaccinated against two diseases - pigeon paramyxovirus infection and pigeon pox.

Vaccinating pigeons is a mass vaccination programme with several hundred being vaccinated at one time. In a well organised system it is possible to vaccinate hundred pigeons against paramyxovirus infection and pox in an hour. Vaccinating guns will be used and one needle may be used to vaccinate 25 or more pigeons. Good vaccinating practices are required.

Whilst you may not wish to do the vaccinating, you do have a responsibility to ensure that the pigeon owner is aware of the correct procedures.

Key Points

Poor vaccination practices occur which may result in death of the pigeon or susceptibility to natural infection.

Vaccination site

There is an extensive web of veins under the skin which extends down the back and sides of the neck. This is more noticeable in the cock than the hen. It stops at the base of the neck. Mortality has resulted from the inadvertent injection of vaccine into the veins. Death usually occurs within an hour of vaccination. Hence, when administering vaccines, it is important to inject as near to the base of the neck as possible with the needle pointing towards the tail.

Aseptic technique

Withdrawing the vaccine from the bottle

Always have one needle that stays in the vaccine bottle that is only used for withdrawing vaccine. The other needles can be used to inject your birds. This stops you inadvertently contaminating the vaccine with dirt from the pigeons skin.

Cleaning the skin

In the authors experience, the use of surgical spirit at the injection site has two major benefits. Firstly, it sanitises the injection site. Secondly, it dampens the feathers around the vaccination site resulting in a clear view for the administration of the vaccine.

Surgical spirit does not stain the feathers and will rapidly evaporate in warm weather. In the short term, if a pigeon is represented for vaccination, this is quite obvious.

Cleaning the needle

One needle will often be used to vaccinate several pigeons ( 1 to several hundred). This may be the cause of problems. When using the Nobilis Paramyxo vaccine it is recommended that you sterilise the needle between pigeons. The importance of sanitising the needle between birds should be stressed.

However, DO NOT do this with Colombovac PMV or PMV/Pox. Neither do I recommend it when using Chevivac-S (paratyphoid vaccine). The reason for this is that the latter 2 vaccines have a live component that could be killed by the sterilising solution.

Hygiene will be improved by using a new sterile needle for every basket of birds. Very expensive birds or birds that are special for other reasons should be brought to the vaccinators attention so that a new needle can be used for that bird.

Nobilis paramyxo

When using Nobi-Vac Paramyxo, this can easily be done using a sponge soaked in surgical spirit contained in a small pot. The needle can be dipped in this in between birds.

Colombovac and Colombovac + Pox

The manufacturer does not recommend dipping the needle in surgical spirit between birds. This is particularly important when vaccinating against Pox. The surgical spirit will kill the Pox vaccine.

Points to watch

1. The stress of vaccination can be reduced by giving a soluble multivitamin preparation from the day prior to vaccinating to the day after vaccination.

2. Advise that the birds are not exercised the day of vaccination. Birds that have been given the live pox vaccine should not be mixed with non vaccinated birds for 6 weeks.

3. Do not vaccinate unhealthy birds.

4. Dirty technique may resulting in vaccination abscesses .

5. Vaccinating hens due to lay may result in retained eggs.

 

Problems associated with poor vaccination technique

Injection abscesses

These are the result of faecal contamination of the needle. The needle can be contaminated by two methods. Firstly, it is dropped onto pigeon faeces. A limited number of needles will be supplied with a bottle of vaccine and if this occurs with the last one, there is little choice but to continue. Secondly, catching and holding the pigeon will inevitably result in the handlers hands becoming contaminated with faeces. You will often see the fancier spit on a faeces covered ring to clean it so that the number can be read and checked off the vaccinating sheet. The same fingers may then be used to pull the feathers back to allow the vaccinator to see the injection site. This simple and normal procedure can quickly contaminate the skin.

Clinical signs associated with injection abscesses

This is a clinical problem that is reported occasionally. The abscess being detected from about 7 to 28 days after vaccination depending on the vigilance of the owner. This author suspects that it may occur more frequently as a subclinical problem that is responsible for leaving pigeons under par.

The initial signs will be lethargy, inappetance, reluctance to fly and a hunched up appearance.

The feathers over the injection site may be seen to be standing up as the swelling enlarges. If left untreated the abscess will enlarge and the bird may die.

Bacteriology

In one investigation, aerobic and anaerobic culture from abscesses regularly yielded Streptococcus faecalis. In addition Clostridium perfringens, Bacteroides oralis and E.coli were isolated. The former two, both being toxin producers were recovered from birds that had died. These are all associated with faecal contamination.

A further small study of the skin of eight healthy pigeons from four lofts failed to yield any anaerobes but did yield four cultures of Staphylococcus epidermidis. The remaining four were sterile. However, examination of the skin of four birds from a loft with a wet dropping problem yielded positive aerobic cultures of Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Lactobacillus spp. from all the birds. (Personal communication Dr.A-M. Farmer, Intervet UK Ltd.). All inactivated vaccines contain adjuvants. The inoculation of bacteria with the vaccine is likely to predispose to abscess formation.

 

Looked better on my original - David

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I keep fancy pigeons and the show season is about to start, and i thought i would vacinate my birds againt PMV for the first time.

 

I was told to buy some columbovac pmv, but I could not find any for sale on the internet. I was recomended this as its safer to use.

 

Instead i've found Nobilis (Nobivac) PMV Vaccine for sale, and i need some advice as how to inject.

 

Does this vacine come with saringes and how do i inject?

 

I read that you inject the skin at the base of the next, away from the head.

 

Looking on Youtube i've seen 2 american videos, showing how to inject between the leg and the body which look easier than at the back of the neck.

 

 

what do you think?

 

 

Seems a shame to have to go the states so you prompted me to do this.

 

http://www.poultryhealthcentre.com/seminars/vacinatepigeon.php

 

with all the other good advice may help.

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Guest spin cycle

be careful when injecting if using an oil based vaccine not to jab yourself...if memory is right nobilis is oil based i think. best to get someone experienced to help/show you how.

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I've found the chap who officaly does the injecting for the local racing pigeon club.

 

he's kindly agreed to do it for me :D I've bought the Nobivac from hyperdrug and it should be with me next week.

 

Hopefully next year i'll get my birds injected when the racing club does theres as they group buy the vacine and inject at the same time.

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